Thursday, April 19, 2012

Awesome Sandwich Bread {gluten, dairy and egg-free}

Pin It I got tired of serving my daughter dry and crumbly store-bought gluten-free bread devoid of any nutritional value.  In all fairness, there are some not-so-bad options on the store shelves, but they are pretty pricey and many of them contain egg.  So I decided to tackle homemade gluten-free, dairy-free, egg-free bread and guess what?  Success!  I started with this recipe from The Wacky Waffle which is written by a friend of a friend.

But homemade bread?  Isn't that hard to make?  Doesn't that take a lot of time?  The answer, my friends, to both questions is 'no'.  Homemade gluten-free bread is not hard to make and it doesn't take a lot of time.  In fact, gluten-free bread is quicker and easier to make than wheat bread because you don't have to knead it and you only have to let it rise once.  This recipe, from start to finish, will only take about hours, and of that time, only about 15 minutes is you actually working.  In case you just don't have hours, this recipe can be made in a bread machine (though I think it turns out best when you make it the old-fashioned way)!

Take a look at the ingredients below and you'll see this is primarily a whole-grain recipe - so it's good for you.  And it tastes good, doesn't crumble and stays fresh in the fridge for at least 5 days!  It can also be stored in the freezer, sliced and ready for toasting.  

After reading through the simplified instructions, please read the "additional notes" section and the bread machine instructions below the recipe for more details.  Please try this bread!  Then come back and tell us how it turned out for you.  I think you'll be surprised at how easy it is to make and how tasty it is to eat.

Awesome Sandwich Bread {gluten, dairy and egg-free} 

1 ½ cups sorghum flour
½ cup buckwheat flour 
1 cup potato or tapioca starch
2 tsp xanthan gum
2 tsp salt
¼ cup ground flaxseed meal
1 TBSP yeast (*don’t add yeast yet if using the delay setting on a bread maker)
¼ cup oil
¼ cup honey
1 ¾ cups warm almond milk (heat about 1 minute in microwave)
1 tsp mild-tasting vinegar (distilled white or apple cider vinegar)

Whisk together dry ingredients (flours, xanthan gum, salt, and ground flaxseed).  Add yeast to dry ingredients unless using the delay setting on a bread maker.  In a separate bowl, mix together wet ingredients (oil, honey, milk and vinegar).  Add dry mix into the wet mix.  Combine thoroughly using the dough hooks on a stand mixer.  This dough is a bit too thick for regular beaters as it gets a little crazy, walking up the beaters.  You’ll know you have the right consistency if your dough is too wet to knead but too thick to pour.  Its kind of like a thick drop biscuit dough.  Transfer dough into glass loaf pan (no need to grease your pan) and let rise for 30 minutes.  Loaf should almost double in size, or be about even with the top of your loaf pan.  Bake in a pre-heated 375 degree oven for 40 minutes.  Your loaf should have a nice medium-brown crust.  Allow bread to cool in the pan until cool enough to remove; then pop bread out of pan by running a butter knife around the edges. Let bread finish cooling on a wire rack. (This prevents the bottom from getting damp.)  Once cool, slice and enjoy or freeze for later! 

Additional Notes: 

Rising:  Here’s my preferred rising method:  Pour boiling water into an oven-safe casserole dish or spare loaf pan and place in the oven.  Then place your loaf in the oven, shut the door and let it rise.  Stick a note on your oven controls to remind yourself not to turn the oven on while your dough is rising.  Oh – maybe that step is just for scattered people such as myself.

Baking:  Leave the above mentioned hot water in the oven during the baking.  This seems to help the bread retain its moisture. 

Ingredients:  Don’t leave out the vinegar!  It really helps with the rise.  Also, if you don't have buckwheat flour, you can replace it with sorghum so that your flour mix would be 2 cups sorghum flour and 1 cup potato or tapioca starch.  I like it best with the buckwheat - I think it improves the texture.

Storage:  This bread stays fresh for at least 5 days stored it in a zip-close plastic bag in the fridge, unsliced.  For longer storage, slice the loaf and store in a zip-close freezer bag in the freezer.  When its time for breakfast toast or a sandwich, simply pop your slices in the toaster and they’re ready to be enjoyed.

Bread Machine Instructions:
This bread can also be made in a bread machine!  Don’t fret if your bread machine doesn’t have a gluten-free cycle.  I have a low-end machine  without a gluten-free cycle and, although I imagine a better machine might produce better results, it gets the job done.  My machine requires that I help it along by scraping around the corners during the mixing cycle – sad, but true.  I've got my eye on this one but I'd love recommendations if you have a machine you like.

In a large mixing bowl, whisk together all your dry ingredients (flours, xanthan gum, salt, and ground flaxseed).  Whisk yeast into dry ingredients unless you are using the delay setting.  If using a delay setting,  you'll add the yeast last -on top of the dry mixture so it doesn't get wet prematurely.  Set aside.

In a separate bowl, whisk together all the wet ingredients (oil, honey, milk and vinegar). Transfer to bread machine.

Into your bread machine, add dry ingredient mixture on top of wet ingredients.  If using delay setting, make a little valley in the flour mixture to hold the yeast there on top of the dry ingredients.

Set your bread machine for a 2 lb loaf and let your machine do the rest.  If you do have a gluten-free cycle, use it.

This recipe is being shared at Homemade Bread ChallengePotluck Party

61 comments:

  1. It looks awesome and I'm going to try it! I think it will help with my colitis which I have been having some issues with for the first time in a long time. I have read that gluten is not my friend (Hmmm would have been nice to know that 30 years ago when I was first diagnosed). I will let you know how it turns out.

    Oh and if you are saving up and wishing for that bread machine you should use SwagBucks to save for it. I have info on how to do that on my blog :) it's how I paid for my food processor.

    Have a great day!
    Paulette
    http://back2basicsmom.blogspot.com/

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    1. I've been wondering about swagbucks - I'll definately visit your blog to learn about it.

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  2. I am eager to try this. Wondering if I can use egg replacer instead of the flax meal? Also use soy instead of Almond milk??

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    1. I can't guarantee the results since I haven't tried the variations, but I'm sure any type of milk would work. As for the egg replacer, I'm guessing it would work but your results will be a little different since the flax also adds to the structure and helps hold the bread together. I say give it a try! Baking allergy-friendly requires a sense of adventure - go for it. And please let us know how the variations turn out.

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  3. I finally have this rising in my oven! Can't wait to try it :)

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    1. So I'm not the only one baking on this ridiculously hot day! Can't wait to hear your thoughts on the bread!

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  4. Not sure if you'll see this in time...but I have this in the oven now. I have 10min left of the 30min 'rise time' and I just peeked at it and it hasnt risen AT ALL. I put the boiling water in the oven w/ the glass loaf pan. I followed your recipe to a T, except I used guar gum instead of the xanthan gum (we have corn sensitivities)...all the things I see in recipes with yeast have you 'proofing' it first in warm water but recipe didnt so I was concerned that thats why its not rising... However I am assuming it rose for you, so I Am trying to figure out what I did wrong! =) My yeast is fairly new, doesnt expire til next year...a little help?? =)
    Anna
    theperrans@cox.net

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    1. Anna - You are right that I do not proof the yeast for this bread (though Im sure you could do it that way) so Im not sure why your bread isn't rising. The things that really affect the rise are the warm milk (warm will encourage the yeast to rise, too hot will kill the yeast) and the vinegar. In my experience, the bread will rise more as it begins to bake. Keep in mind that gluten-free bread won't rise quite as much as wheat bread, but this recipe usually rises nicely. It may be that you need to let it rise a bit longer, say 45 minutes. I haven't baked with guar gum so I don't know if that makes much difference, but I wouldn't think so. Please let me know how it turns out! I'm on pins and needles hoping you have a success!

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    2. Hi, Mrs. Forsyth!
      I'm a teen on a quest to find the perfect, soft, rice-less sandwich bread. I stumbled upon your site recently and I've made this bread several times already, each time hoping it will taste better. (I guess that's kind of silly, isn't it? Making the same thing the same way and hoping for a different result :) ) Anyway, it always comes out rather dense, doesn't rise very much, and ends up tasting very "yeasty". I follow your recipe exactly, except for the fact I use more sorghum instead of the buckwheat and regular cow's milk for the almond. What am I doing wrong? My yeast is new and I even proofed it to see if it made any difference, but it always turns out dense. Any tips on how to make it rise A LOT more? Thanks, any help is appreciated.
      - Sabrina

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    3. Sabrina - So glad you hear you are baking for yourself, but sorry that the bread isn't rising for you! Im not sure what to suggest. I don't think the flour substitutions would make too much difference or the cow's milk, though I haven't made it that way myself. I always have good success when I do my rising in a small, closed-in space like in the microwave. I put my loaf in there with a bowl of steaming hot water and let it sit for about 30 minutes, maybe 45 minutes. Sorry I can't suggest any other ideas. I really hope it works out for you!

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  5. I love this recipe! Just made it again yesterday for my boys, and it turned out great. For the question about yeast - when adding it to recipes with the dry ingredients (instead of proofing first), it's best if you have instant yeast, not active dry yeast. The instant yeast will produce a MUCH better rise. I get my instant yeast at Amazon.

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    1. Im so glad to hear that you are enjoying it so much! And thanks for the yeast tip. I use regular yeast with good success, but perhaps I'll try instant next time (is that also called "rapid rise"?)

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  6. Just found your blog! Can the flours be replaced with GF All Purpose flour?

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    1. I'm really not sure - I've never tried it. If I were to guess, I'd say it would probably work, but would end up being a little different depending on what flours are in the mix. If you try it, please let us know how it works so others can benefit from your experiment. - Thanks for stopping by!

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  7. We've attempted this bread twice now. Both times it looks fantastic in the oven, rising to become a great loaf. However, after coming out of the oven it collapses within 10 minutes. The bread inside is not gooey exactly but very moist and like putty. The crust is fantastic and makes me happy but I certainly can't call it bread. The second time we baked it longer but the results were similar. We're new to GF, DF, EF baking. Any ideas as to what we're missing? We used all the ingredients listed. We used potato flour both times but also have tapioca to try.

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    1. Thank you for asking! I'm sorry you've had difficulties with the bread. I think I know why its not working for you. You mentioned that you used potato flour. Potato FLOUR and Potato STARCH are two very different things and will give you a very different product. This recipe requires potato STARCH or tapioca STARCH. These are white, powdery starches similar to corn starch (which you might also be able to use, though I haven't tried it). The only other thing I can think of is the type of buckwheat flour you use could affect it too. I haven't had good success using Bob's Red Mill buckwheat flour - but I think this would only affect it slightly, not what you're describing. I know from experience that GF, DF, EF baking failures can be very discouraging, but if you have the courage to try again using potato starch instead of potato flour, please let me know if that fixes the problem. I think it should!

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    2. Get a bread machine! I bought a Cuisinart with gluten free function. It comes out perfect. I have made substitutions to this recipe such as using cow's milk, one egg, and also almond meal instead of buckwheat. I also added 2 tablespoons of coconut flour because of added moisture of the egg. Next I am going to try teff flour for part of the flour. Also I use Hodgson Mill yeast in packets (5/16 oz.). They are exactly one tablespoon, and give the bread a nice rise that doesn't sink in the middle.

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  8. I commented earlier saying that our two attempts at this bread ended in collapsed loaves. I double checked the recipe online and my print out. Somehow the sorghum flour was not on the print out. I printed via your website but have no idea how it would have gotten removed. We will try again with all the flours and report back!

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    1. Well that should definately make a huge difference! Also see my reply about the potato flour vs potato starch. Can't wait to hear how it works for you this time!

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  9. I just found your blog as I was searching for a new bread recipe! Love the recipe. I'm trying it for the first time right now in the bread machine. And did you get the bread machine yet? I have the Cuisinart that you are wanting, and it is great!! Makes perfect bread every time. : o )

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    1. I'm so glad to know you're trying out the bread recipe. I hope you enjoy it. And, no - I haven't gotten a new bread machine yet and I really need one. The last loaf I made in my old one didn't turn out at all as it had globs of flour stuck on all the sides not mixed in. Guess its time. Glad to know the Cuisinart is working well for you. Enjoy!

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  10. Thank you thank you thank you...my son who has the same allergies as your baking loved this...which is huge...the recipe is so simple too

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    1. Yaaaah! That makes me so happy to hear! So glad it fit your needs and was simple!

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  11. I am eager to try your recipe, the only one I could find online that covers all the basis. I have recently started using my breadmaker so was glad to see that you included that option. I have enjoyed the kamut and spelt bread that I have made but kamut is wheat and both have gluten. Although I am not aware of having allergies, I want to try WF and GF bread after reading Wheat Belly. I'm all for losing the belly and some weight at the same time.

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  12. One more question - has anyone tried replacing the honey with agave nectar? I have a vegan friend that is very interested in this recipe ~ thanks, liz

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    1. I haven't tried it, but I'm pretty sure it would work just fine! Anyone else tried it? Please post!

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    2. sorry if this posts twice...but i just realized that I never responded about the agave nectar - it worked great as a 1:1 replacement and i can buy it in bulk at costco without worrying about crystalization - we make about 2 loaves if not more for a 4 year old - i'm tempted to eat it myself too!! thank you

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    3. Thanks for the update! Glad to know agave works in place of the honey. And so glad your little one is enjoying the bread so much! I often end up eating it when I make it for my daughter - tastes good and such better ingredients than store bought bread.

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  13. I just tried your recipe for the first time and I have a couple of questions/comments -- first, the bread didn't rise very much, but I think I'll try the instant yeast suggestion I read in the comments and see if that works better next time. My question is, my loaf turned out a very gray color, due to the buckwheat flour I assume (Arrowhead mills). How come your loaf looks so non-gray?
    The flavor and texture of the bread was great!

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    1. Heather - Glad the flavor and texture were good! Im not sure about why it didn't rise much - did you try the water-in-the-oven trick? You could also try mixing your yeast with the warm non-dairy milk and let it bubble up while you put together the rest of the ingredients. Then you'll know if your yeast is fresh and working. As for the color, I can't figure why it would be gray. The picture may be of the loaf I made with straight sorghum/starch instead of sorghum/buckwheat/starch (can't remember for sure). When you make it without buckwheat it does turn out lighter colored but I don't think the texture is as good. Best of luck!

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    2. I tried it again and this time it rose beautifully and was really delicious, moist, and chewy. I got a new packet of rapid rise yeast. I think that was the problem. My first try was with some old yeast. I did try the water in the oven trick both times. Also the first time I used a cast iron bread pan and this time I used a metal Calphalon pan. I don't know if that would make any difference with the rise. I can't believe how easy this was to make - easiest bread ever! It's still a gray-ish color though, due to the buckwheat. I really don't mind the color at all, but my 5 yr old does.

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    3. So glad it worked well this time and that you found it so easy! I use Hodgson Mill buckwheat flour and haven't had it turn out gray. Maybe you can just serve your 5 year old by candlelight :)

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  14. With such luck with your muffin recipe today, I decided to try this bread recipe as well. I have to say it is divine! We used coconut milk and regular GF active dry yeast. I don't have a glass loaf pan so used a regular metal Calphalon pan and it worked fine. Is glass supposedly better for GF baking? Regardless, the bread is chewy, moist, and tastes like...real bread. Yay! Thanks much for posting this recipe.

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  15. ps I used buckwheat flour as per recipe and it did turn out a little gray, but it looks much like banana bread (buckwheat seems to resemble the banana flecks) so I wonder if kids would notice/care?

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    1. You're not the only one with the buckwheat/gray problem. I have discovered there is a huge difference among brands of buckwheat flour - wondering which brand you used?

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    2. Bob's Red Mill...I've heard there are differences too. My kids love it and didn't even mention the color. My husband is not gluten intolerant and he tried the bread, said he likes it better than regular bread!

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    3. Thanks for letting me know. Im glad Bobs Red Mill worked for you - that's the one I've had difficulty using. I can't make my buckwheat pancakes with Bob's Red Mill, but Hodgson Mill buckwheat flour works great. I guess one if ground finer than another? Anyway, glad you're family is enjoying the bread!

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  16. I know this is a stretch but would you think that this could be made with something other than buckwheat? My son is also allergic to wheat ontop of the big three. I have been trying for over a year to come up with a bread recipe and nothing has been worthy of making again.

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    1. The short answer is yes, you can omit the buckwheat and replace it with the same amount of sorghum flour so you'll be using 2 cups sorghum flour and no buckwheat. But just so you know, buckwheat contains NO WHEAT. Its name is misleading, but buckwheat is actually not a grain at all but a seed and is not related to wheat. Hope you enjoy the bread!

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  17. Thank you for the information! I cant wait to try it out.

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  18. Is this dense like store bought gluten free-vegan bread? Or is it soft?

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    1. I would say its like any homemade, whole grain bread. Its not soft like wonder bread because it doesn't have artificial ingredients and dough conditioners. But, in my opinion, its much better than the store bought versions we've tried.

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  19. Just wondering if you or anyone else has tried with different milks? Trying to cut almond out for a bit to see if that makes a difference for my son...rice? Coconut? Thanks

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    1. I have not tried it with different milks, but Im pretty sure it would be fine. I have made it with water in place of almond milk and that worked. It seems to have a slightly better texture using almond milk vs water, but it works. I would suggest rice milk to try. I'd be afraid the coconut milk would alter the flavor. Please come back and let us know your results! Thanks.

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    2. I just re-read some of the above comments and noticed one reader "KT" had success using coconut milk - so go for it!

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  20. I've done it with rice milk, coconut milk and almond milk, all have turned out good!

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  21. I have 'sweet' sorghum flour but not sorghum flour. Do you think it will turn out alright? I also have corn starch but no tapioca or potato starches... Somewhere in the comments I think you said corn starch would be a viable substitute.

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    1. Sweet sorghum is exactly what I use - I think that's the only way they sell it, so yes, it will be perfect! As for the cornstarch, I haven't tried it but in most recipes you can interchange those three starches. So, while I can't guarantee the results, I would expect it to turn out fine. Maybe you can report back with your results. Happy baking!

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  22. This bread is amazing! I have perused the recipes on your blog for a few years but haven't tried many of them because my kiddos were not gluten free (just dairy/egg/soy/tree nut free). However...a recent diagnosis of Celiac for one of my boys and EE for my other one and I have been scrambling to adjust our recipes. Thank the Lord this blog came back to my mind and this bread was one of the first I have tried. PERFECTION! My 5 year old boys gobbled it up and one of them asked..."Mama are you SURE this is safe?" because it tasted nothing like the GF products we have tried so far. So....Thank YOU! We will be trying out many more of you recipes! I subbed rice milk for the almond milk with no issue at all.

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    1. I'm so happy to hear that your family is enjoying the bread! This is the kind of encouragement that keeps me sharing recipes!

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  23. I am so happy you gave us this recipe, it's the best gluten-free, dairy-free bread I ever ate! Since now, I will only do this bread, all my family loves it. Thank you so much ;)

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  24. I made the first in the oven and it wouldn't come out of the glass pan - and now I have a loaf in the bread machine - its an old Betty Crocker with 3 times on it - 2 + hours - 3:20 or 3:40 I'm doing the middle one - but not sure if that's too much? thank you!
    Cheryl

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  25. Oh - also - I bought sorghum not in flour form! I had to grind it in my nutribullet and it turned out great. I also think I bought the wrong buckwheat but I'm still in the learning process. The bread that wouldn't come out - still tastes good!!!!
    Cheryl

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  26. the bread machine worked perfectly on the 3:20 setting - best taste ever!!!! And it came out easily.
    Cheryl

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  27. Amy tips on what to use instead of flaxseeds? Can I use chia seeds? My son can't have sunflowers and linseed but otherwise the recipe looks great. Any help would be much appreciated as I am desperate to find a bread he can eat without the side effects!

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  28. My son loved this bread! I misplaced the recipe (went to make more last night and stressed cause I couldnt find it, thank goodness I located it). Never again will I buy dry, crumbly, tasteless tapioca bread, all he could say was how moist and yummy the bread is. Thank you, thank you, thank you for this recipe..... another god send in our food allergy world! I havent tried it in my bread maker (no gf setting and I get confused without specific step by step on how to do it without that setting.)

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    1. Michelle
      I use the bread maker - it's an old plain jane. It turns out great - I just whisk yeast into dry ingredients and do as it says. Any questions, let me know : )

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  29. Im so glad to hear that! Thanks for taking the time to let me know - it makes me happy to know others are benefiting from our recipes! As for the bread machine, I have a low-end bread maker without the gf setting, and I've had success making it on the regular setting - just be sure to add the ingredients in the order I listed and you should be fine.

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  30. I just wanted to comment that the bread is great! BUT anyone making this because of wheat allergy or Celiac disease should not use any of the above mentioned brands of buckwheat flour as they are NOT gluten free. I just got off the phone with Hodgson Mill customer service, and while buckwheat is naturally GF, it is not on their GF list because it is processed in a shared facility. However their other GF flours use the ELISA testing methods and assured me that they test to less than 5ppm. Arrowhead doesn't test ANY of their flours. Bob's whole buckwheat is considered GF, but NOT their buckwheat flour. So the search for uncontaminated bw flour continues. (I subbed teff and it was GREAT tho ;)

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